Metastatic testicular cancer survivor: A positive attitude was everything for me

In 2001, I was 31 years old, working full time and engaged to be married. I had no symptoms or abnormalities. But one day, I noticed a knot on my left testicle.  After going to see my doctor in Monroe, Louisiana, I was diagnosed with a rare form of testicular cancer. I underwent surgery to have the testicle removed. I wanted the results of my biopsy sent to MD Anderson. A week after surgery, I received a call that the cancer had spread to my bones, including my pelvis and left lung. I was told that my cancer was aggressive and that my walking would be impaired. This was devastating to hear. My fiancée and I were excited to start our life together. But she assured me that whatever happened, we would face it together. Facing the unknown of a metastatic testicular cancer diagnosis It’s been 20 years, but I still remember everything about my first appointment at MD Anderson. It was on Sept. 11, 2001. The day terrorist attacks fell upon the World Trade Center. Before meeting with my doctors, my then-fiancée and I stopped to grab coffee, and that’s when we saw the devastation on everyone’s faces. We joined the crowd around a TV screen and learned of the news.  I met with care team, including my orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Patrick Lin. My treatment plan was an aggressive regimen of five types of chemotherapy, along with multiple surgeries to remove the tumors. Although my fiancée and I were scared, she vowed to stand by me through it all. I was ready to do whatever was needed to...