COVID-19: How to separate fact from fiction

News headlines about the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic seem to change by the minute. And it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the massive amounts of information available online. So, how can you tell what is factual information and what is not? Here are six suggestions for how to separate fact from fiction. 1. Make sure that the information is coming from an authoritative source on COVID-19. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) are centralized authorities for factual information about the coronavirus, including the latest developments on prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Academic institutions in the United States that focus on infectious diseases and public health, such as Johns Hopkins University and the University of Washington, also have coordinated information about COVID-19 and the latest case tallies. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is a centralized authority on cancer. It has current information for patients and providers about COVID-19 and its impact on cancer care. MD Anderson, with its experts in multidisciplinary care and infectious diseases, can provide specific guidance on how to manage your cancer care during the coronavirus pandemic. It also offers factual and authoritative information on its Novel Coronavirus Precautions website. 2. Check that the information is recently published. Timestamps and datelines are important in a rapidly changing situation. Information from last week may not be factual or relevant today. 3. Trust local authorities to have the most accurate coronavirus information for your community. Your local city or county health department, as well as local hospitals, will have the most current information about available testing sites. Local public safety officials...