Ovarian cancer survivor: 4 lessons I learned from treatment

One of the best pieces of advice I got before starting chemotherapy to treat stage III ovarian cancer was from my oncologist, Dr. Aaron Shafer. He said it was important to continue working and spending time with my friends and family, to keep my life as normal as possible. Otherwise, I could fall into a negative mindset, which would only make my treatment feel harder. I believe staying positive is just as important as the drugs that are administered. So, I followed his advice. And except for the days on which I had chemotherapy infusions, I worked the entire time, either from home or in the office. I also didn’t really discuss my treatment at work. It’s not that I was trying to hide it; I was very open if someone asked me about it. I just didn’t want the fact that I had cancer to be the first thing people focused on when they saw or talked to me. I also didn’t want to be treated any differently. That’s why I made it a point to wear a wig any time I left the house. I was losing my hair due to chemotherapy, and the wig gave me confidence I’d be seen as “normal,” since everything else I was going through was anything but. Here are some other lessons I learned during treatment. Letting people help you helps them, too I’m the kind of person who never wants to inconvenience anyone, so I typically do things myself. But I knew I wasn’t going to be at 100% during treatment, and I couldn’t risk running myself into the ground....