Breast cancer survivor: Don’t wait to have lumps looked at

My dad’s mother was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was in her 60s. But that was considered pretty normal at the time, so she didn’t have any genetic testing done. That’s why it was such a shock to be diagnosed with breast cancer myself at age 28 in January 2017. As far as I knew, my grandmother and I were the only people in my family who’d ever had cancer. Because I was so young when I was diagnosed, I got genetic testing done almost immediately. That’s how I learned that my breast cancer was related to two genetic mutations: BRCA2 and HER2. I also discovered that literally all of the women on my paternal grandmother’s side of the family had had some type of BRCA2-related cancer, too — so I’d inherited that genetic mutation from her. My breast cancer diagnosis I was still breastfeeding my youngest child in late 2016 when I felt a lump in my right breast. I figured it was just a clogged milk duct, so I ignored it. But it started getting bigger. My husband finally convinced me to get it checked out. So I went to my doctor. She sent me in for a mammogram. The day after that, I had a biopsy, and I was diagnosed with stage III invasive ductal carcinoma. Now, I tell everyone that if you have a lump, get it checked today. Don’t put it off. I ignored mine for months. If I hadn’t, I might’ve just been able to have a lumpectomy, instead of all the different kinds of treatment I received. I also urge people...