19 ways to help someone during cancer treatment

When someone you know receives a cancer diagnosis, you want to help. But how? Instead of asking what you can do to help, it’s usually better to find a concrete way to support your friend or loved one, and do it. Some people may not feel comfortable asking for help, or the list of things they need help with may seem too long and overwhelming. But what can you do that will actually be helpful? We asked our Facebook community to share helpful things friends and family members have done to support them. Here are their suggestions. Take care of the grocery shopping, or order groceries online and have them delivered. Help keep their household running. Cook, clean, mow the lawn, wash the laundry and/or dishes, make sure the bills get paid, get the kids dressed for school, walk the dog and do all of the things that the person in cancer treatment would normally do to keep life going for the rest of the family. Bring a cup of tea or coffee and stop by for a visit. Just keep in mind that cancer patients often struggle with fatigue, so don’t stay too long – unless they ask you to stay longer. Give the primary caregiver a break. Go to doctor’s appointments in the caregiver’s place, help out with the kids or pets, organize medications, or send the patient’s spouse, parent or child off for massage or a night or weekend to unwind. This can ease the caregiver’s stress, and give him or her the energy to keep going. Drive the patient to appointments. And when treatment is...

19 ways to help someone during cancer treatment

When someone you know receives a cancer diagnosis, you want to help. But how? Instead of asking what you can do to help, it’s usually better to find a concrete way to support your friend or loved one, and do it. Some people may not feel comfortable asking for help, or the list of things they need help with may seem too long and overwhelming. But what can you do that will actually be helpful? We asked our Facebook community to share helpful things friends and family members have done to support them. Here are their suggestions. Take care of the grocery shopping, or order groceries online and have them delivered. Help keep their household running. Cook, clean, mow the lawn, wash the laundry and/or dishes, make sure the bills get paid, get the kids dressed for school, walk the dog and do all of the things that the person in cancer treatment would normally do to keep life going for the rest of the family. Bring a cup of tea or coffee and stop by for a visit. Just keep in mind that cancer patients often struggle with fatigue, so don’t stay too long – unless they ask you to stay longer. Give the primary caregiver a break. Go to doctor’s appointments in the caregiver’s place, help out with the kids or pets, organize medications, or send the patient’s spouse, parent or child off for massage or a night or weekend to unwind. This can ease the caregiver’s stress, and give him or her the energy to keep going. Drive the patient to appointments. And when treatment is...