Why I braved the big city for cervical cancer treatment

I don’t like change. But sometimes you have to be willing to make one in order to survive. That’s what I did. I’m a small town girl who’s lived in southern Mississippi my whole life. And except for one trip to a resort in Mexico, I haven’t travelled more than about 500 miles away from my little Gulf Coast town. Then I came to MD Anderson for cervical cancer treatment in November 2016. Before then, I’d never even been on an airplane by myself. And it was scary, going from my small town to the fourth largest city in the country without my husband. I never thought I could do it. But I did. And today, I am cancer-free. My cervical cancer diagnosis I was originally diagnosed with stage I cervical cancer in January 2014, after experiencing heavy vaginal bleeding. Three years earlier, I’d had a procedure called an endometrial ablation, in which the lining of the uterus is destroyed to reduce the severity of a woman’s menstrual flow. It worked at first. My periods were very light for a long time. Then I started bleeding heavily again, and I thought, “Oh, no. We’re not doing this.” So, I went back to my ob/gyn to schedule a hysterectomy. I wanted this taken care of. But she performed a pelvic exam and noticed some abnormalities in my cervix. A Pap test and a biopsy both came back positive for cervical cancer. So instead of a hysterectomy, I had seven weeks of chemotherapy and 35 radiation treatments at a facility near my home. Later that year, a PET scan showed a...

Why I braved the big city for cervical cancer treatment

I don’t like change. But sometimes you have to be willing to make one in order to survive. That’s what I did. I’m a small town girl who’s lived in southern Mississippi my whole life. And except for one trip to a resort in Mexico, I haven’t travelled more than about 500 miles away from my little Gulf Coast town. Then I came to MD Anderson for cervical cancer treatment in November 2016. Before then, I’d never even been on an airplane by myself. And it was scary, going from my small town to the fourth largest city in the country without my husband. I never thought I could do it. But I did. And today, I am cancer-free. My cervical cancer diagnosis I was originally diagnosed with stage I cervical cancer in January 2014, after experiencing heavy vaginal bleeding. Three years earlier, I’d had a procedure called an endometrial ablation, in which the lining of the uterus is destroyed to reduce the severity of a woman’s menstrual flow. It worked at first. My periods were very light for a long time. Then I started bleeding heavily again, and I thought, “Oh, no. We’re not doing this.” So, I went back to my ob/gyn to schedule a hysterectomy. I wanted this taken care of. But she performed a pelvic exam and noticed some abnormalities in my cervix. A Pap test and a biopsy both came back positive for cervical cancer. So instead of a hysterectomy, I had seven weeks of chemotherapy and 35 radiation treatments at a facility near my home. Later that year, a PET scan showed a...