3 things I learned during Ewing’s sarcoma treatment

In November 2016, when I was 9 years old, I was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma. My parents took me to MD Anderson, where I had chemotherapy, surgery and radiation therapy. I also got daily injections for 11 months, to keep me from developing blood clots. I’m glad that all of those treatments worked, because I haven’t shown any signs of cancer since my surgery in February 2017. I still had to finish my treatments after surgery to make sure the Ewing’s sarcoma was completely gone, but I learned a few things during those 10 months. Here are three of them. You can get used to anything Of all the treatments I received, the Lovenox injections worried me most. Those were a shot in my stomach every day — and sometimes twice a day — for months and months. The chemotherapy didn’t really hurt or scare me, but it did make me lose all my hair. The radiation therapy didn’t hurt either, but they made me feel really sick. And when I saw the radiation machine for the first time, I thought it looked like a giant donut that was going to eat me. So as silly as it sounds now, I have to admit, I was a little afraid of it. Over time, though, I got used to everything. To deal with losing my hair, I found fun hair garments to wear. I learned how to handle the IVs while getting chemotherapy. And I even learned how to sleep with a bandage wrapped around my middle from the radiation burns. I had lots of peeling skin, and it was...

3 things I learned during Ewing’s sarcoma treatment

In November 2016, when I was 9 years old, I was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma. My parents took me to MD Anderson, where I had chemotherapy, surgery and radiation therapy. I also got daily injections for 11 months, to keep me from developing blood clots. I’m glad that all of those treatments worked, because I haven’t shown any signs of cancer since my surgery in February 2017. I still had to finish my treatments after surgery to make sure the Ewing’s sarcoma was completely gone, but I learned a few things during those 10 months. Here are three of them. You can get used to anything Of all the treatments I received, the Lovenox injections worried me most. Those were a shot in my stomach every day — and sometimes twice a day — for months and months. The chemotherapy didn’t really hurt or scare me, but it did make me lose all my hair. The radiation therapy didn’t hurt either, but they made me feel really sick. And when I saw the radiation machine for the first time, I thought it looked like a giant donut that was going to eat me. So as silly as it sounds now, I have to admit, I was a little afraid of it. Over time, though, I got used to everything. To deal with losing my hair, I found fun hair garments to wear. I learned how to handle the IVs while getting chemotherapy. And I even learned how to sleep with a bandage wrapped around my middle from the radiation burns. I had lots of peeling skin, and it was...