B-cell lymphoma diagnosis gives survivor new perspective

Aaron Allcorn thought a persistent head cold was causing his stuffy nose and snoring. But after what was supposed to be routine nasal surgery, he learned his doctor had removed a large gray mass from his nasal passages. Three weeks later, he got the biopsy results: his “head cold” was actually diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. “When the doctor told me I had lymphoma, I really didn’t know what that meant until he said he had already made an appointment for me to see a physician at MD Anderson in the Bay Area who had experience treating this type of cancer,” Aaron says. Finding hope in MD Anderson Shock turned to fear as the weight of those words began to settle in. Aaron’s father had died of cancer at age 57, and Aaron had always considered his dad too young. Aaron was 46. “I was too young to have cancer, but after I began treatment I realized I wasn’t the only one that was too young,” Aaron says. Aaron’s mind raced with thoughts of his three kids and his wife, as he remembered losing his own father. “But when I heard those words ‘MD Anderson,’ I truly felt some measure of comfort,” Aaron says. “I knew MD Anderson was just the best place in the world to be.” To Aaron, MD Anderson meant more than cancer treatment. The name stood for cutting-edge research, and with that came unparalleled knowledge and resources his late father didn’t have. He and his wife adopted famed NASA flight director Gene Kranz’s motto “failure is not an option” and resolved to fight for his life....