A brain tumor didn’t end my dreams

My first thought after being diagnosed with a brain tumor at age 26 was fear. Would I die? Would the things I worked for no longer be possible? How was I going to handle brain tumor surgery and cancer treatment when I can’t even handle flu shots? Even what I was going to look like with no hair scared me. I was diagnosed with adult medulloblastoma one month before my graduation from law school. Medulloblastoma is a type of brain tumor that’s common in children, but rare in adults. I wasn’t used to not knowing what was going to happen next. My life had always been a steady progression: college, then law school – and it was supposed to continue to landing my first job and starting a family. I was grieving for a life I felt I was losing. Many of us who have been diagnosed with cancer understand that it feels like losing a loved one. You go through the five stages of grief. I had to let myself grieve and let others support me in my anger and sadness. That’s the only way to get through it. Support during brain cancer treatment After surgery to remove the brain tumor, I went through radiation and chemotherapy. Treatment was rough. It made me very sick and nauseous. As independent as I claim to be, I had to lean on my family and friends. Their love and support were the only things that got me into the car and to the hospital or radiation center when staying home seemed preferable. Only with their encouragement was I able to finish...